Shall We Dance 1937

Shall We Dance 1937

Shall We Dance 1937

Shall We Dance 1937, En fin, morsom, og inspirerende film 🙂

Put on your dancing shoes! Stop wasting time!
Put on your dancing shoes, watch your spirit fly!
Life is short, we are growing older!
You better dance little lady, dance little man, whenever you can!

Shall We Dance 1937 is a budding romance between a ballet master and a tapdancer becomes complicated when rumours surface that they’re already married. (109 mins.)
Director: Mark Sandrich
Stars: Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, Edward Everett Horton, Eric Blore

Shall We Dance 1937 by Alice-Bauer
Shall We Dance. released in 1937, is the seventh of the ten Astaire-Rogers musical comedy films.
The idea for the film originated in the studio’s desire to exploit the successful formula created by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart with their 1936 Broadway hit On Your Toes.
The musical featured an American dancer getting involved with a touring Russian ballet company, and featured the famous «Slaughter on Tenth Avenue» satirical ballet created by the Russian émigré choreographer George Balanchine.
In a major coup for RKO, Pan Berman managed to attract the Gershwins – George Gershwin who wrote the symphonic underscore and Ira Gershwin the lyrics – to score this, their second Hollywood musical after Delicious in 1931.

Astaire was born in Omaha, Nebraska, the son of Johanna «Ann» (née Geilus) and Frederic «Fritz» Austerlitz (born September 8, 1868 as Friedrich Emanuel Austerlitz). Astaire’s mother was born in the United States to Lutheran German immigrants from East Prussia and Alsace. Astaire’s father was born in Linz, Austria, to Jewish parents who had converted to Roman Catholicism.

After arriving in New York City at age 24 on October 26, 1892, and being inspected at Ellis Island, Astaire’s father, hoping to find work in his brewing trade, moved to Omaha, Nebraska, and landed a job with the Storz Brewing Company. Astaire’s mother dreamed of escaping Omaha by virtue of her children’s talents, after Astaire’s sister, Adele Astaire, early on revealed herself to be an instinctive dancer and singer. She planned a «brother and sister act,» which was common in vaudeville at the time. Although Astaire refused dance lessons at first, he easily mimicked his older sister’s steps and took up piano, accordion, and clarinet.

When their father suddenly lost his job, the family moved to New York City in 1905 to launch the show business career of the children, who began training at the Alviene Master School of the Theatre and Academy of Cultural Arts.

Despite Adele and Fred’s teasing rivalry, they quickly acknowledged their individual strengths, his durability and her greater talent. Fred and Adele’s mother suggested they change their name to «Astaire,» as she felt «Austerlitz» sounded reminiscent of the name of a battle. Family legend attributes the name to an uncle surnamed «L’Astaire.»[9] They were taught dance, speaking, and singing in preparation for developing an act. Their first act was called Juvenile Artists Presenting an Electric Musical Toe-Dancing Novelty. Fred wore a top hat and tails in the first half and a lobster outfit in the second. In an interview, Astaire’s daughter, Ava Astaire McKenzie, observed that they often put Fred in a top hat to make him look taller.[10] The goofy act debuted in Keyport, New Jersey, in a «tryout theater.» The local paper wrote, «the Astaires are the greatest child act in vaudeville.»

As a result of their father’s salesmanship, Fred and Adele rapidly landed a major contract and played the famed Orpheum Circuit in the Midwest, Western and some Southern cities in the United States. Soon Adele grew to at least three inches taller than Fred and the pair began to look incongruous. The family decided to take a two-year break from show business to let time take its course and to avoid trouble from the Gerry Society and the child labor laws of the time. In 1912, Fred became an Episcopalian. The career of the Astaire siblings resumed with mixed fortunes, though with increasing skill and polish, as they began to incorporate tap dancing into their routines. Astaire’s dancing was inspired by Bill «Bojangles» Robinson and John «Bubbles» Sublett. From vaudeville dancer Aurelio Coccia, they learned the tango, waltz, and other ballroom dances popularized by Vernon and Irene Castle. Some sources state that the Astaire siblings appeared in a 1915 film titled Fanchon, the Cricket, starring Mary Pickford, but the Astaires have consistently denied this.

By age 14, Fred had taken on the musical responsibilities for their act. He first met George Gershwin, who was working as a song plugger for Jerome H. Remick’s music publishing company, in 1916. Fred had already been hunting for new music and dance ideas. Their chance meeting was to deeply affect the careers of both artists. Astaire was always on the lookout for new steps on the circuit and was starting to demonstrate his ceaseless quest for novelty and perfection. The Astaires broke into Broadway in 1917 with Over the Top, a patriotic revue. The Astaires performed for U.S. and Allied troops at this time too….
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